Favourite Comics Of 2010: Best Ongoing Comic Series

The rules are for this category are a little vague as well, as the very concept of an “ongoing” series is changing all the time. Here’s the rules I used for this category: If it’s over 10 issues, and at least 2 of those issues took place in 2010, it’s an ongoing. Some of these are new series, and at least two of them ended this year. The way the industry is going I could see half of these being cancelled next year, so make sure you get and out and support the comics you love.

20) Birds Of Prey by Gail Simone and Ed Benes (DC Comics)

Gail Simone is back on the dance floor, with a relaunch of the comic that brough her to the party in the first place. Nobody writes kung-fu treachery like Simone, and this is a breath of fresh air in the increasingly stagnant swamp that is the DCU.

19) The Sixth Gun by Calen Bunn & Brian Hurtt (Oni Press)

The team that brought us the criminally underrated The Damned is back with a weird western ongoing that combines horror, action, and western bad-assery. Combining supernatural horror and western gunfighter drama is a tricky proposition, but Bunn & Hurtt do a bang up job of keeping the tension up.

18) Punisher Max by Jason Aaron & Steve Dillon (Marvel)

I can’t believe I bought a Punisher comic. On purpose. It’s been years since I’ve read anything about this utterly 2 dimensional character that interested me, but I’ve heard so much about this version that I thought I would give it a try. And I’m glad that I did. For those of you unfamiliar with Punisher Max, the concept is this: Man has wife and kids. Mob kills wife and kids. Man spends 30 years killing mob. Mob isn’t happy. That’s all you need to know. No superheroes, no mutants, no nothing other than pure, violent revenge. Enter the Kingpin. Aaron introduces the Kingpin mythos into the Max format so effortlessly and so realistically that you end up believing that this was the origin the character should have had all along. Jason Aaron is quickly becoming the next big name in comics, and for good reason.

17) Thor: The Mighty Avenger by Roger Langridge & Chris Samnee (Marvel)

Um, sorry?  Like a lot of people, I didn’t hear about this until it was cancelled. It’s a shame, as this is a perfect title for both kids and adults, the likes of which are becoming quite scarce. It’s a retelling of the origin of Thor, but done in such a bright, optimistic way that makes you miss the feeling you had reading superhero comics as a kid. Anybody that complains that “they don’t make comics the way they used to” hasn’t read this.

16) The Unwritten by Mike Carey & Peter Gross (Vertigo)

Although I can’t say that I’m as hardcore about this book as a lot of people, I do think it’s actually improving in quality, and I’m now at the point where I can give this book my highest compliment and say that I can’t wait to read what happens next. It’s the story of Tommy Taylor, the son of the author of a fantasy series so popular it dwarfs Harry Potter, Narnia, and Twilight combined. When the fiction of the novels start to seep into Tommy’s real life, he freaks out. A lot. Like I said, I’m enjoying this a lot, but maybe not as much as I hoped I would, considering how much I like Carey’s two previous Vertigo ongoings (Lucifer, Crossing Midnight). That being said, if you stopped reading comics after Sandman was cancelled, this might be your way back in the door.

15) Secret Six by Gail Simone and Jim Calafiore (DC Comics)

A book so good you won’t believe it’s published by DC. Gail Simone seems to excel (prefer?) operating on the outer fringes of the regular DCU, and this book is one of those rare superhero books that seem to get better with every issue. Every superhero writer should use this book as a textbook on how to build interesting characters.

14) Justice League:  Generation Lost by Judd Winick, Keith Giffen, and Aaron Lopresti (DC Comics)

I had resigned myself to never following a book with the word ‘Justice” in the title again, and then along came this superb team book, resurrecting some of DC’s most beloved, yet most maligned characters, the JLI. Although this book is very continuity heavy, and no non-DC fan would have any idea what is going on with this extremely plot heavy book, Winick also makes sure that character motivation is the books priority. This group always works best as a group of underdogs, and Winick pushes that aspect of their history heavily. Lots of fun and action.

13) Echo by Terry Moore (Abstract Studios)

I’m not entirely sure that this should have gone past issue 12, as this is starting to ramble a little. But Moore’s attention to character detail still make this science fiction drama worth following as it comes to an end next year.

12) The Sword by the Luna Brothers (Image)

Argh! This was probably the most disappointing end to a comic series I’ve read in years. Not because it was so bad (it really wasn’t), but because the rest of the series was so damn good. After one of the great reveals in recent comic book memory, this action packed series ended with an issue of monologuing so hackneyed that even Doctor Doom would have been embarrassed to spout it. The series as a whole still stands up though, and I can’t wait to see what the immensely talented Luna Brothers come up with next.

11) Chew by John Layman & Rob Guillory (Image)

Whew! This was a close one. This was one of 2009’s best comics discoveries, but started to rapidly decline in quality after its initial arc. Thankfully Layman has toned down the “HOLYCRAPDIDIDYOUSEEWHATHEJUSTATE!!???” hijinks and replaced them with some nice character building instead. There are still some pacing problems, but it’s definitely still worth your time and money. Still the best gastro-detective story on the market.

10) The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard (Image)

Still around? Yep. Still great? Yep. New TV series that happened to launch as the most successful cable show of the season? Yep. This was Robert Kirman’s year, and it’s a testament to his commitment to the girl who brought him to the dance in the first place that he’s worked so hard at keeping the greatest zombie comic of all time as good as it’s ever been.

9) Unknown Soldier by Joshua Dysart and various artists (Vertigo)

One of my favourites of 2009 ended this year. Unfortunately, I feel as if it dropped a little in quality, as the last 2 arcs just felt rushed. There were still enough great moments to put this on the top 10 this year though. There aren’t that many fiction comics that deal with current events in believable ways, and unfortunately two of them (this, along with Ex Machina) closed up shop this year. Think Manchurian Candidate meets Hotel Rwanda.

8) Sweet Tooth by Jeff Lemire (Vertigo)

This may be the most depressing post-apocalyptic road movie never made. This year brought new depth and back story to the great characters that Lemire introduced last year, while still creating a sense of cautious dread about what’s to come. The joy never evaporates completely though, and small sense of optimism is growing as Lemire’s mini-epic continues.

7) Powers by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming (Icon)

Although this book has departed quite a bit from its original “Normal cops in a superhero world” concept, Bendis and Oeming’s hearts are still in this book. Although the books gets increasingly more “superheroey” with every arc, it still very much a “character first” book. Bendis and Oeming remain one of the most dynamic teams in the business.

6) Rasl by Jeff Smith

The only reason this isn’t higher on my list is its infrequency, but that shouldn’t stop you from picking up this little sci-fi gem of a potboiler. Due to the strength of Bone, Smith has become of one of the grand old masters of the comic book form, and deservedly so. What’s most impressive about Rasl is that it’s so intentionally different from the work that Smith is most well-known for. Smith is taking some serious creative risks here, and it’s paying off. If you like your sci-fi tense, smart, and character driven, this is the book for you.

5) Orc Stain by James Stokoe (Image)

Vancouver native Stokoe is doing some innovative world building here, and this has become one of the most unique books on the stands VERY quickly. It’s the slow-burning story of One-Eye, an orc with one eye (Ha!) that’s just struggling to get by in an orc-eat-orc world. This is modern fantasy storytelling done right, with artwork that threatens to jump off the page and punch you in the junk. Poxa Gronka!

4) Ex Machina by Brian K. Vaughan and Tony Harris (Wildstorm)

A case could be made that this should have ended 2 years before it did, but then we might not have gotten such an appropriate, bittersweet ending. This may be the best political comic book of all time, and I really hope that Vaughan and Harris do something together again soon. There are things about the ending that I liked, and things that I liked not as much, but all in all I can’t imagine a more perfect finale.

3) Scalped by Jason Aaron & R.M. Guéra (Vertigo)

With all due respect to Ed Brubaker and Greg Rucka, Scalped remains the best crime comic on the market, and for good reason. This book is a masterclass in tension-building, and I can’t count the times that I’ve been hesitant to turn the page in fear of what these horribly flawed characters are going to do to themselves next. I know that Aaron is becoming quite popular for his superhero work, but I hope that he never loses his dedication to this crime fiction classic.

2) Scarlet by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev (Icon)

I hate you. Yes, you. You are the person who reads Avengers, and Ultimate Spider-Man, and pretty much everything else that Brian Michael Bendis touches and turns into superhero gold. Why do I hate you? Because you are the reason why he doesn’t have time to do more books like this. This was my favourite “new” ongoing of the year, and might have even taken the top spot if it had more issues under its belt. This title is that rare comic beast: It’s based on current events.  There aren’t enough comics that tackle social issues. I don’t mean in a “Don’t do drugs kids!” way, but in a meaningful dialogue that acknowledges that most difficult problems have difficult solutions. It confronts reality head on, with very little filter. If my sole measuring stick was how big my emotional response was to a comic, this would have been number one. Not to mention that this is as well crafted a comic as you’ll see this decade. Oh, and Alex Maleev is a frickin’ genius. There are the only 2 people on the planet that could have produced this comic book, and I’m glad that they did.

1) Northlanders by Brian Wood and various artists (Vertigo)

The best Viking anthology comic of all time is still that good. In fact, this series seems to be getting better with every arc, although I’m not sure how that’s possible. I think that Brian Wood’s trick is that there is no trick. Just plain old-fashioned storytelling. I’ve said elsewhere that Brian Wood is probably my favourite writer in the business right now, and one of the main reasons is his utter fearlessness in terms of challenging himself, by telling stories that may be out of his comfort range. As a result, his style keeps evolving, and his books just get better and better.

Honorable mention: New Avengers by Brian Michael Bendis and Stuart Immonen (Marvel), Jonah Hex by Jimmy Palmiotti, Justin Grey, and various artists (DC Comics),  X-Factor by Peter David and various artists (Marvel), King City by Brandon Graham (Image)

Next up: Best original graphic novel!

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The Great Comic Book Cull of 2010/2011 Part Five: DC Comics – Batwoman to Black Adam

I’ve gotten a few comments commenting on how little I’m culling, as opposed to keeping. I actually culled quite a bit of Batman, probably half a shelf worth, but right now I’m finding that most of the stuff I’m reading still holds up as worth keeping. I’m trying to downsize my collection, not eliminate it, much to my wife’s dismay.

BatwomanElegy

This the collection of a short run that Greg Rucka & J.H. Williams had on Detective Comics last year, focusing on my favourite lesbian that dresses up like a bat. Sorry, Jody Foster, you’re just going to have to keep reaching for the stars.

J.H. Williams has become one of the most unique and interesting artists in comic books today, and it’s a thrill to see him on a smaller profile book like this. Even if Greg Rucka’s script wasn’t good (it is), I’d keep this just for the art. One of the the best DC books of recent years, and I’m hoping that the new upcoming Batwoman series can keep the momentum going.

KEEP.

Birds Of Prey 11 Assorted Trades.

One of the most successful DC “female” comics.  The concept is this: Barbara Gordon (Quick history: She used to be Commisioner Gordon’s daughter. Then his niece. Then his stepdaughter. Then his daughter again. She also used to be a librarian. Then a congresswoman. Then a librarian again. Somehow in the middle of all this she found time to occasionally be Batgirl, but then Joker shot her and showed her dad/stepdad/uncle naked pictures of her. She’s also now a parapalegic, which I think was the extra cherry on that particular day’s shit sundae. Now she’s called Oracle and works as an IT analyst/information broker for the superhero set.) decides to start sending her own agents out on specific missions she designates. Initially this is limited to Black Canary, but eventually other heroes (Huntress, Lady Blackhawk, etc) join in.

Chuck Dixon was the first writer on this series (orginally a series of minis), and the first two arcs of his run are collected in trade. These trades are decent, and worth keeping if only for Gary Frank’s pencil work, but the misogyny is running high in places. They take every opportunity to showcase Black Canary in skimpy, revealing outfits, and much is made of her horrible taste in men, and how she has very little control of herself around smarmy, overbearing assholes. That being said, it’s a good start to what would become a cult fave among superhero fans. Things went along at a decent pace for about 60 issues, until Gail Simone came along. She almost instantly revitalized the series, to the extent that for a while this was my favourite DC book.

The next 40 issues are a clinic in how to rebuild a character. Simone takes Black Canary from being a B level also-ran, to an A level world-class hero in just a few years. By the end of Simone’s run, Canary is one of the world’s greatest martial artists, and was soon made chairman of the Justice League. Also, this is one of my favourite martial art comic books, and there is more kung-fu asskickery in one trade of this series than a thousand Jackie Chan movies.  

This series isn’t perfect though. The art is inconsistent, especially in later trades, and you can tell that certain editorial decisions (like marrying Black Canary off) don’t sit well with Simone. She left the book soon after, and it didn’t take long for DC to cancel it. Thankfully that’s been rectified, and Gail Simone and Ed Benes are back on the book that they made famous.

KEEP

Black Adam The Dark Age.

One of the best recent examples of character building that I can remember is DC’s 52 series. They took several forgotten or underused characters, and spent an entire year rebuilding those characters, and giving them new purpose. It stuck for the most part, and several of them have gone on to their own series. Black Adam is a prime example of how well this worked, and between 52 and it’s follow up World War 3, Adam had been set up as one of DC’s great villains. This mini dealt with the aftermath of those series, and shows Adam trying to regain both his power and his lost love. Peter Tomasi is one of DC’s stronger contemporary writers, and he crafts an emotional, and effective tale. Black Adam is such a sympathetic character that you can’t help but cheer for him, even when he’s beating the crap out of your favourite heroes. Kudos also to the great Doug Mahnke for his ever improving artwork here.

KEEP

Next up: Booster Gold. Yes, that’s his superhero name. Hey, I just review ’em, I don’t write ’em.